Switchfoot

As they enter their 17th year as a band, Switchfoot has achieved a level of success that brothers Jon and Tim Foreman and their high-school friend Chad Butler never anticipated when forming the band in San Diego in 1996. The SoCal natives have sold 5.5 million copies worldwide of their eight studio albums (including their 2003 double-platinum breakthrough The Beautiful Letdown and 2009’s Grammy Award-winning Hello Hurricane), racked up a string of Alternative radio hit singles (“Meant to Live,” “Dare You To Move,” “Mess of Me,” “The Sound (John M. Perkins’ Blues),” “Dark Horses,” and “Afterlife”), performed sold-out world tours (visiting five continents in the past year alone), raised hundreds of thousands of dollars to aid homeless kids in their community through their own Bro-Am Foundation, and earned themselves a global fan base devoted to Switchfoot’s emotionally intelligent and uplifting brand of alternative rock.

Sidewalk Prophets

Their background may have made it look easy—after all, Sidewalk Prophets toured with Jeremy Camp and Audio Adrenaline on the strength of independent albums, and then rode the popularity of their first Word Records release, These Simple Truths, to a Dove Award for Best New Artist and a nomination for Pop/Contemporary Album of the Year. “The Words I Would Say” hit #3, “You Can Have Me” went Top 20, a Christmas single, “Hope Was Born This Night,” hit the Top 10, and “You Love Me Anyway” went all the way to #1 on the Billboard Christian Singles chart. The band has toured with the Rock and Worship Roadshow with Mercy Me and Francesca Battistelli, among others, and landed another Dove nomination for Group of the Year in 2011.

Shawn McDonald

Those who’ve followed Shawn McDonald’s celebrated career in any capacity already know he’s consistently one to defy artistic conventions and push himself well beyond the boundaries of comfort zones. In fact, when we last heard from the critically revered singer/songwriter, he was forsaking the traditional greatest hits compilation route to cap off his first ten years of expression, and instead, turned in a batch of past re-imaginings and future foreshadowing’s on 2013’s The Analog Sessions. Considering the Eugene, Oregon native and longtime Columbus, Ohio resident has always marched to his own creative drum, it’s all the more fitting his first entirely new studio offering in three years is a bold reinvention, though never at the expense of the vulnerable, heartfelt lyrical sentiments that have always made McDonald one of the most authentically relatable artists of his generation.

Seventh Day Slumber

Seventh Day Slumber front man Joseph Rojas has an image in his mind. You might even call it a vision. Angels and saints are in Heaven, surrounding the throne of God, singing anthems of praise. At the same time, here on Earth, praises ascend skyward. They are the anthems of the imperfect children of God, expressions of hope from a place much darker than Heaven, songs of honesty and victory. And in Rojas’s vision, they’re set to pounding drums and scorching guitars.
Honesty and candor have been trademarks of Rojas’s path from the depths of a cocaine-fueled suicide attempt through miraculous salvation in the back of an ambulance to the top of the Christian music charts. Seventh Day Slumber has long been heralded as a band that refuses to sugarcoat the struggles of real life. As the band has matured over the last 15 years, they’ve faced newfound challenges head on, and today their perspective and relevancy are as strong as ever, and their anthems of praise are even more profound.

Todd Agnew

Every story has a hero, a main character, and a protagonist.  In a book, the hero is fairly easy to identify.  In life, Todd Agnew found it a little harder. Agnew, the worship leader, musician and songwriter behind hits like “Grace Like Rain” and “My Jesus,” viewed Christianity as a life to be lived for God, with himself as the main character.  God, however, held a different view. Being the author of the story, God began to write a new understanding for Todd as well.
God started a new chapter by introducing a loving wife and children into the equation.  The gentle hand of God began to show Agnew that loving God and even loving his neighbor, while important and necessary, was not life’s central theme. This story is about God; He is the Prime Mover.  Everything else is moving in relation to Him.  So while Agnew already knew how to love, he now had to learn how to be loved. He had to learn to receive from the Giver, to be consoled by the Comforter, to be encouraged by the Hope.  The act of receiving recognizes the worth of the one giving.

Thousand Foot Krutch

After nearly a decade as one of Tooth & Nail Records’ top selling artists, TFK once again blazed their own path through uncharted territory to become one hundred percent independent. The recording of The End Is Where We Begin was completely funded through a Kickstarter campaign that shattered all expectations and propelled the album to number one on the Billboard Hard Rock chart.

Thousand Foot Krutch’s music has always been enveloped with heat and energy. The interplay between the pulsing bass, courtesy of Joel Bruyere, and pounding drums of Steve Augustine are the backbone over which Trevor spits out some of the most rapid fire and melodic lyrics in rock and roll. While musically “heavy,” they’ve always veered more towards the funk of Rage Against the Machine while simultaneously incorporating the fast-paced, rhythmic singing of Michael Jackson circa the Bad days.

The End Is Where We Begin was not only the start of a new chapter for the band, but one of those rare albums that delivered exactly what the fans wanted, and something that would be difficult to top. 
Fast forward two years and over 250 shows, TFK reunited with Aaron Sprinkle (who co-produced 2003’sPhenomenon, 2009’s Welcome To The Masquerade, and The End Is Where We Begin) to once again co-produce alongside front man Trevor McNevan.

The Digital Age

Asked about the art and craft of novel writing, E.L. Doctorow once famously stated: “It’s like driving a car at night. You never see further than your headlights, but you can make the whole trip that way.”
That analogy applies to so many creative pursuits—recording an album, for example. But let’s suppose the musical group in question leaves behind a celebrated past to traverse an uncertain future: one so speculative that even the group’s name isn’t quite settled yet when the road trip begins. To take Doctorow’s analogy a step further, it’s like driving a car at night with one headlight, a spotty GPS signal and no gas stations for another hundred miles.
Yet the long, strange trip that saw four core members of the David Crowder*Band become The Digital Age has yielded one stunning testament to multi- dimensional faith: faith in the music, faith expressed through the music and faith the musicians had in each other.

Warren Barfield

At eighteen Warren Barfield used his dorm room as an office and booked one year of concerts. With his parents’ blessing he loaded his 1995, 4 cylinders, mint green Mustang with a suitcase and a guitar and took his songs on the road. After more than 600 “gigs” and 200,000 miles, Warren found himself in Nashville, TN signing his first record deal.

Since his arrival in Nashville, he has released three records, had five songs top the Christian charts, received two Dove nominations, worked with legendary producers including Brown Bannister, Mark Hammond, Marshall Altman, Charlie Peacock, and Mark Miller. He’s shared the stage with the best of CCM artists from Steven Curtis Chapman and Third Day to Toby Mac. He wrote and recorded “Love is Not a Fight” which was the theme song for the #1 indie film FIREPROOF. He shares his songs and stories with thousands every year as he tours the country.

Warren currently lives in Nashville, TN with his wife Megan, their son Montgomery and their daughter Ada Beth.

Zerbin

Formed in Edmonton in 2009, this all-Canadian band has wowed fans and industry alike with their infectious live performance and studio releases.

They’ve shared stages with the likes of The Flaming Lips, FUN, Said The Whale and AWOLNATION, cementing their status as a band to watch. Boasting a remarkable musical versatility, Zerbin has carved out anthemic tunes, and symphonic organic rock with multiple Top 40 releases on Modern Rock charts. Unwilling to settle for mere sing song memorability, Zerbin creates moments of sentiment and spirituality. It’s this musical prowess that landed them two 2012 Edmonton Music Awards for Music Video of the Year and Single of the Year.

33 Miles

33 Miles’ lead singer Jason Barton joined a kind of Christian boy band called True Vibe in 1999. They made two very successful records. At that point he realized that he wanted to do something he could call his own. He began looking for someone to start his own group with. When he was introduced to guitarist Christ Lockwood they knew it was a good fit. Along with Collin Staddard on keys and background vocals, they made up the band 33 Miles. The choose the name because Jesus lived 33 years and a mile represents his journey.

They signed with INO records and in 2007 released their self titled Debut album that year. That album was followed by One Life in 2008. The following year they released a Christmas album called Believe. In early 2010 Collin, the keyboardist was asked by a church to become their full time worship pastor. After months of deliberation he decided to take the position and leave 33 Miles. The two remaining members continued on recording thier latest album Today (2010).